DaichiKoda

Fukushima Land to live on 2011-2012  <Description>

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Description
On 11 March 2011, a powerful earthquake and tsunami hit Japan and brought much tragedy and loss to Northeastern Japan. It was so devastating that most Japanese couldn't find words for it, they couldn't even cry.
I went to Fukushima a month later, on 9 April, with a clear idea on my mind:I needed to see for myself what was going on there.Despite all the useful information provided by various news organizations, I could not really imagine what had happened and was still happening in the affected area.
What I learned from the news did not connect to my daily life.
I felt I needed to experience the Fukushima-reality myself, not just as a photographer but also as a Japanese. As expected, I found utter devastation and mostly dead towns. When however I came to the area where entry was banned I encountered people who attempted to keep on living on their land, despite the radioactive contamination. Their numbers are increasing. I took photographs of them. They do not show the terrible catastrophe and incredible tragedy that we associate with Fukushima. Instead they show how people continue to go about their lives on their contaminated land.
For them, it is still a land to live on.

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